Sticky post

The Death of the Teen Dystopian Movie

It’s been ten years since the first Hunger Games film was released. Can you believe it? Let me take you back to the 2010s, before Tiktok, before Zoom, before Masks…ah, a blissful time. Before our own real-life dystopia happened, the 2010s provided us with many examples of what could happen if the world was plunged into disaster. There’s no doubt that dystopia is a wide genre; many may think of The Walking Dead, The 100 or The Society (so many ‘thes’), but there was something about the Teen Dystopian Movie that hypnotised our generation.  Continue reading The Death of the Teen Dystopian Movie

Creative Corner- Enough

I used to take the long way home,Just to prolong the feelingOf being on my way to see you.Maybe I mistook anticipation for joy —Footsteps propelled forward by the sound ofAretha Franklin’s voice and the promise that soonMy cold mouth would be kissed.I note the subtlety of other small remembrances;Spraying my wrists with scents of peach and jasmine,Brushing the taste of the night off my … Continue reading Creative Corner- Enough

Reading Corner: Eat, Pray, Love: To Burn or Not to Burn?

Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert: the cliché, the sensation, the purported tale of white privilege. This Christmas, I picked it up. What could be more intriguing than a book loved and widely hated in equal measure? This book is the memoir of freshly divorced 34-year-old Elizabeth Gilbert who sets out on a year of travel to rediscover herself and escape depression. Now, I’ve watched … Continue reading Reading Corner: Eat, Pray, Love: To Burn or Not to Burn?

Reading Corner: The Poetry of Erin Hanson

I promise I will save you, When you cannot stay afloat, And if your tears can fill an ocean, Then for you I’ll be a boat. ~e.h Poem Source: Tumblr Upon scrolling through Pinterest in 2017, I came across a poem by Erin Hanson. You may have seen her poems on Pinterest or other social media platforms, identifiable by her handle: e.h. The poem stuck … Continue reading Reading Corner: The Poetry of Erin Hanson

Bookstore Politics: Sally Rooney’s Translation Trouble

You’ve probably heard of Sally Rooney, the mastermind behind Normal People, Conversations with Friendsand most recently, Beautiful World, Where Are You. At just thirty years of age, Rooney has gathered much critical acclaim and success, along with a lot of publicity and people have been eagerly awaiting her latest book and whilst it has been met with significant praise, discussion has also turned toward her decision not to translate the book into Hebrew.  Continue reading Bookstore Politics: Sally Rooney’s Translation Trouble

From The Well of Loneliness to Exciting Times: LGBTQ+ Narratives, Ninety Years Apart

with uproar, leading to the book being banned under the Obscene Publications Act . This was because Hall had chosen to write from the perspective of a lesbian protagonist, Stephen. Stephen is assigned female at birth but given a traditionally masculine name due to their parents’ desire for a male child; this begins a life of identity conflict. The depiction of Stephen’s complicated relationship with their sexuality and gender speaks to Hall’s lived experience with gender dysphoria. The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography says that Hall believed that they were “a man trapped in a woman’s body”. Like the young Stephen, who likes to be called Nelson, Hall adopted a male pseudonym to write under, Radclyffe. A portrait of Hall painted in 1918bears a striking resemblance to Stephen in their later years, which suggests that what makes The Well of Loneliness so heartrending is that the emotional anguish comes from the heart of the author. Hall’s experience as someone who did not identify as the gender assigned to them at birth, is such an important narrative to read and understand – and to have been writing this story as early as 1928 marks out Hall as a revolutionary. Continue reading From The Well of Loneliness to Exciting Times: LGBTQ+ Narratives, Ninety Years Apart

How Important is it to Change Your Diet to Support Environmental Causes?

Are you feeling gut wrenchingly guilty after watching Netflix’s Seaspiracy? Created by the same team responsible for Cowspirarcy, the 2014 eco-film that helped usher in veganism as en vogue, Seaspiracy holds a shocking mirror to the impact our fishing industry is having on the environment. Your favourite California roll is probably looking less appetising, and rightly so. The film has pushed many to consider changing … Continue reading How Important is it to Change Your Diet to Support Environmental Causes?

Reading Corner: To Imagination: Reflecting on Emily Brontë’s Poetry

Most of us turn to Wuthering Heights when we think of one of our most esteemed writers – Emily Brontë, and understandably so. Her first and only novel (owing to her premature death), is a work of genius which laces together desire, grief, and the inner workings of the human psyche with the gothic setting of the vast Yorkshire Moors. I first read Wuthering Heights … Continue reading Reading Corner: To Imagination: Reflecting on Emily Brontë’s Poetry

Reading Corner: Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez

Is it weird to read Love in the Time of Cholera in the middle of a global pandemic? Maybe not, but it is becoming a bit of a cliché. Gabriel García Márquez’s novel has had a resurgence in readership since the start of COVID-19, even inspiring the title of a TV show: Love in the Time of Corona. But is the book a comfort during times of illness, or an exploration of what happens when love goes too far? Continue reading Reading Corner: Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez

Bleed Greener: Cli-Fi, a Genre to Save Us All?

This year, I have been thinking a great deal about the role of the arts and humanities in the fight against climate change. While I have heard anecdotes about interdisciplinary projects that aim to tackle the ongoing environmental crisis from a range of different scholarly perspectives, it is troubling that the input of the humanities scholars is often reportedly neglected in favour of the data produced by the scientists and geographers. Undoubtedly, there is a sound rationale behind such a decision: we need data to assess the extent of the problem, and to develop practical recommendations for change. However, I strongly believe that the arts and humanities have serious untapped potential for helping to divert our course away from environmental catastrophe. Continue reading Bleed Greener: Cli-Fi, a Genre to Save Us All?