An Elegy for Topshop

The pandemic has claimed its latest victim. First it was Debenhams and now it’s ‘Big Topshop’. The Oxford Street Aladdin’s cave, filled with bubble tea, crop tops in twelve different colors and pulsating tunes is no more. London has lost a landmark, a teenage haven and the ‘one-stop shop’ of fashion. With news of the closure of Topshop’s flagship store coming just a month after the Arcadia group announced it was going into administration, the decline of this fashion house is on very palpable horizons. Topshop is, I do not dispute, a contributor to fast fashion (see here for tips on all important sustainable shopping), but it is also a brand with enormous cultural and personal significance; it exists for many millennial’s and Gen Z’s as the uniform of their teens. Continue reading An Elegy for Topshop

The Fashion Industry: Ignoring the Plus-Size and Petite Communities

It is common knowledge by now that the fashion industry is not as inclusive as it could and should be. One of the areas of fashion that lacks inclusivity is the sizing range that clothing stores and companies offer to customers. ‘Regular’ sizes in the UK consist of anything between a size 6 and a size 16. Anything outside of this ‘regular’ sizing is then considered to be petite or plus-sized. Whilst the fashion industry is trying its best to be inclusive by featuring petite and plus-size ranges as parts of their collections, it doesn’t always hit the mark. Continue reading The Fashion Industry: Ignoring the Plus-Size and Petite Communities

Bleed Greener: Sustainable Alternatives to Fast Fashion, the World’s Best-Dresser Polluter

In recent years, consumers have demanded more and more from the fashion industry. They clamour for greater quantities of garments to fill their already-bursting wardrobes, to keep up with fleeting TikTok fashion trends and, most importantly, to appear on their well-curated social media accounts. The fashion industry has undergone a significant shift in recent years, rapidly adapting to the purchasing habits of modern consumers. Above all, people are seeking more clothing than ever before, and this sartorial excess comes at the cost of the environment. Continue reading Bleed Greener: Sustainable Alternatives to Fast Fashion, the World’s Best-Dresser Polluter

Problematic Lockdown Shopping Habits

Finding ways to deal with lockdown boredom can sometimes feel like a pointless endeavour. However, many have taken to online shopping as a remedy to quell such mundanity. As the ‘physical’ fashion industry has taken a slight pause with the cancellation of summer fashion shows and September fashion weeks looking increasingly unlikely, the virtual fast fashion world has kept charging on at its usual unsustainable speed. PFS discovered in a recent survey of 2,000 Brits that “three in five (60%) consumers have purchased more goods since the lockdown began, than they did before, with 53% having shopped more online”. Moreover, the report outlined that “more than three quarters (77%) of these […] expect they will continue to purchase online more once the lockdown is over – indicating a potentially irreversible change in consumer purchasing behaviour”. But what does an “irreversible change” in UK consumer behaviour mean for the employees at the bottom of the supply chain and the environment? Continue reading Problematic Lockdown Shopping Habits

Don’t Let Fashion Go To Waste: How To Save the World From Fast Fashion

If I had to pick my favorite European country, it would be Sweden, where Alfred Nobel manufactured dynamite, where Basshunter recorded his debut album, where Jonny Johansson gave away his first hundred pair of jeans before Acne swept Europe with its awkward but extremely beautiful fashion silhouettes. But its most important contribution to the world to date might just be the export of ‘fast fashion’ … Continue reading Don’t Let Fashion Go To Waste: How To Save the World From Fast Fashion